Posts filed under ‘Brush Chippers’

About Brush Chippers

What is a brush chipper?

Brush chipper” has a two-fold definition. First and foremost, it is a machine that cuts and chips wood into smaller, more manageable pieces. Second, it is a machine that cuts logs into sawdust. Overall, both definitions mean about the same thing, but one is a bit closer to the point. A brush chipper is designed to cut down on the amount of yard work or tree work that a person has to do in order to remove limbs and/or branches or pieces of wood. A brush chipper makes this process easier by chipping the wood into pieces that can easily be disposed of, either by bagging and setting out with the trash, using as mulch, or selling.

Many different gardening tractor companies sell brush chippers. There are hundreds of brand name brush chippers, and picking the right one for the job means wading through all of the ads and the spam and settling on one particular brush chipper (sometimes regardless of the brand). Each brush chipper is similar to another one, and there are not many that are unique. No matter the package you wrap it in, the function of a brush chipper remains the same on the inside: chipping wood into small pieces.

The basic brush chipper was invented in 1927 by Charles W. Keith, and was originally designed with the intention of making food for livestock out of hay, alfalfa, and straw. A boom in the gardening industry came in the 1950s that expanded the use of the chipper (or “cutter” as Mr. Keith called it) to smaller branches. It would be nearly thirty more years before the more contemporary versions of the brush chipper would be designed.

Who uses brush chippers?

Brush chippers are used by many different types of people and for many different purposes. Most often, brush chippers are used for gardening needs or for landscaping purposes, and are used by groundskeepers, gardeners, landscapers, carpenters, and farm specialists. On the other hand, there are many professions that use brush chippers in order to make their jobs easier, such as lumberjacks, machine operators, conservation workers, utilities workers, road crews, construction workers, and many more.

What kinds of brush chippers are there?

There are two basic kinds of brush chippers available today. Depending on the needs of the specific person using it, you may or may not need all of the functions of one or the other. Some more costly brush chippers are equipped with both functionalities, but the average gardener/yard worker does not need this commercial-style brush chipper.

The first kind of brush chipper is the direct drive brush chipper. This kind of brush chipper makes sure that the blades keep rotating whenever the motor is running. When the motor is shut off, the blades disengage and slow to a halt. This type of brush chipper generally does not operate with the assistance of a high-maintenance belt or pulley. This helps to provide a faster rate of speed for the flywheel (or drum, or whatever the blades are mounted onto), making the chipping/shredding process more efficient.

The second kind of brush chipper is the clutch brush chipper. In this style of brush chipper, a clutch disengages the blades when they are not being used. These models are generally simpler to start and allow the motor to gear down with heavier material, making them more efficient for those with thicker branches and limbs to cut. The average brush chipper can handle a branch up to three inches in diameter, normally. The clutch model of the brush chipper is more time efficient than the direct drive model, and is more expensive, because they have many more safety features than the direct drive model. However, the clutch must be kept lubricated in order for it to work the way it was designed to work. Many industrial type clutch brush chippers have reversible clutches that are mechanized for smoother operation, safer features, and less opportunities for jams to develop.

How do they work?

Brush chippers are equipped with blades that chop the wood. These blades are hinged, meaning that they turn and rotate in order to chip the wood into small pieces. The hinged blades (often steel) rotate at a very high rpm, and this motion ensures that no large pieces of wood are expelled from the machine, making for an even cut and equal composition of the shredded pieces.

Generally, leaves, twigs, sticks, and branches are put into the brush chipper via a ramp. This ramp leads downward into the workings of the machine in order to make sure that the wood is fed into the blades in a safe manner. Most brush chippers have an adjustable ramp to make sure that the person feeding the wood into the chipper does not get their hands caught in the blades.

The motor of a common brush chipper has about eight horsepower. While that is infinitesimal in comparison with other motors (cars can have hundreds of horsepower, for example), it gets the job done quickly and efficiently while saving money and giving the person chipping a valuable asset in mulch or sawdust that can be used for other things. On the other hand, some commercial and/or industrial brush chippers have as many as 5000 horsepower, making them a force to be reckoned with

What are the basic parts of a brush chipper?

A brush chipper is generally comprised of three basic mechanisms. While the workings of a brush chipper are complex, and a motor has many small parts that make up the whole, most brush chippers have three common factors that make them what they are. Each individual part may be slightly different, making for the difference in brand names, etc… but the overall construction is not that diverse.

Steel blades (also called “knives”) are what chip the wood. These chipping blades are mounted onto a drum or flywheel and use stored energy to keep in motion, accelerated by an electric motor or internal combustion engine. They use this rotating motion, averaging 1000-2000 rpm, to chip the pieces of wood into small or shredded pieces. Most brush chippers can grind wood into sawdust or chip it into mulch, depending on the brush chipper and its particular settings. Generally, the more blades or knives the brush chipper has, the more efficiently it will chip the wood. These blades do have to be sharpened from time to time in order to function properly, and only someone who has an idea of what they are doing should attempt this.

The chute is the adjustable ramp that feeds the wood into the machine. The size of the chute dictates the size and amount of material that the brush chipper can handle.  This is also called a hopper, and some have grooved rollers that help feed the wood into the chipping chamber in order to prevent injuries. If a branch is stuck or clothing is hung in the machine, the rollers are generally reversible and can help prevent injuries by releasing the stuck material as well.

A tamper is used to push the material down the chute and into the brush chipper via the chipping chamber. This tamper is primarily a safety feature and is not required for the brush chipper to work; it is in place to allow the machine to work safely. Some tampers on smaller models are used by hand, and tampers on larger models or industrial/commercial models can be mechanized or on rollers.

How big are brush chippers?

Brush chippers vary in their size and capabilities. While some home versions are small and lightweight enough to be pulled/pushed by hand or with a riding lawn tractor, others are very large and require a tractor-trailer to haul. It depends on the size of the job at hand. However, the general makeup of the brush chipper remains primarily the same no matter the size of the box it comes in. The mechanisms for operating the brush chipper are also about the same. The size of the engine and knives may differ, but they still have the same basic parts.

Are brush chippers dangerous?

If used improperly, brush chippers can cause serious injuries and even death. Even in today’s safety-conscientious world, workers are killed every year from becoming caught in the blades or hung on the rollers of the brush chipper. For instance, a study done about fatal and nonfatal injuries over a 10-year period (1992-2002) showed a total of 31 men died during a ten-year period. Over two thousand men were injured during this same study, some serious. Of the more than 2000 injuries, nearly one-tenth of these were amputations (mostly of the upper extremities). A few safety precautions should always be followed when using a brush chipper, even if it is just a small home model.

1.     Always wear safety goggles. A piece of material flying out of the brush chipper can land in your eye (s). This can have serious consequences, including serious injury to the eye itself, and even blindness.  Safety goggles also protect the sensitive areas around the eyes.

2.      Wear a hard hat to protect your head from flying debris. Chunks of wood can fly up the chute when they hit the blade or out of the exit after they are chipped. These pieces can be large and a blow to the head can be serious or fatal.

3.      Train new workers on how to use a brush chipper. If you are using one at home for gardening, have the store you buy it from show you how to use it. Many home and garden centers also offer safety classes for the proper use of things like brush chippers, so consider taking a class before you use the brush chipper for the first time.

4.      Use earplugs while operating the brush chipper. Most brush chippers are loud, and the noise can hurt your ears. This will also keep small pieces of debris from getting into your ears.

5.      Never stick your hand into the chipping chamber. This is extremely dangerous (not to mention insanely unwise), and can result in serious cuts, loss of fingers, or loss of the whole hand. Always wait until the blades have completely stopped rotating before attempting to dislodge stuck material. If there is an emergency lockout system (most large brush chippers or industrial/commercial brush chippers have them), use it.

6.      Wear clothing that is safety-conducive. Close-fitting shirts, cuff-less gloves and pants, and boots with non-skid soles are recognized as proper gear for use when operating a brush chipper. Loose clothing or cuffs can become stuck in the rollers or chipping chamber, causing serious injury or death. Boots with slippery soles will not help when trying to dislodge material and can cause the worker to slip and fall, with devastating results.

7.      Make sure the area around the brush chipper is clean. Keep loose debris piled away from the brush chipper in order to prevent slips or trips. Loose material can pose hazards such as tripping and jamming a stick into skin as well, or becoming tangled in clothing and causing injuries.

8.      Always push the thicker end of the branch in first. This helps to prevent the amount of material in the chipping chamber from getting jammed. It also makes it easier to feed the material into the brush chipper. To avoid injuries, place smaller branches/twigs on tope of larger ones. Additionally, allow the feed mechanism to pull the branch in instead of feeding with your hand.

9.      Before using a brush chipper, make sure you read all instructions associated with the machine. Learn where the controls are and what each one does. Most manufacturers include emergency cut-off switches or other safety features on the brush chippers, so be sure you familiarize yourself with these before you attempt to use the machine. Make sure that anyone else who may use the machine is also familiar with these features as well.

10.  Inspect the brush chipper before each use.  Never just assume that because you had no problem last time you used it you will have no problems this time. Always examine the chipping chamber, blades, feeding rollers, tamper, exit shaft, and feeding chute before you start your work for the day. Make sure there is no material stuck from the last time it was used, or any blades that need to be sharpened. Also, make sure the rollers to the chipping chamber are working properly to avoid jams.

11.  Finally, remember that brush chippers were designed to cut and shred organic material such as wood, grass, hay, alfalfa, and other similar materials.  There has been controversial material released regarding the use of brush chippers for euthanizing purposes. Do not try this at home, and make sure you never put anything living into a brush chipper.

In Summary

Brush chippers are a valuable asset to many different types of outdoors workers. Whether you are using a home version to do gardening or yard work or an industrial model to do other types of work, always use a brush chipper for the purposes it was designed to fulfill. The chipped wood can be a valuable contribution to your garden or landscape if used properly, and brush chippers help cut down on the amount of material that is put into our landfills each year. Many people in the world are becoming more conscious about the role we play in the protection of our environment and the conservation of our natural resources. The “green” way to make needed mulch and sawdust is to use a brush chipper that does not use gasoline to power the engine, but there are other ways to make environmentally-friendly mulch.

While brush chippers are helpful in the garden, they are also dangerous. Keep children away from them, and put them in a safe place to prevent young people from becoming curious and injuring themselves. A brush chipper is a dangerous tool, but can be a time and cost efficient way of handling organic debris in your yard or for business purposes. Take care of your brush chipper like you would any other valuable piece of equipment

This article was created by brushchippers.org for more articles like this please visit their website.

To buy a new or used Brush Chipper, or other kinds of forestry Equipment please Visit our website.


Wood Chippers & More serves all 50 states & territories: Alaska [AK] Alabama [AL] Arkansas [AR] Arizona [AZ] California [CA] Colorado [CO] Connecticut [CT] Delaware [DE] Florida [FL] Georgia [GA] Hawaii [HI] Iowa [IA] Idaho [ID] Illinois [IL] Indiana [IN] Kansas [KS] Kentucky [KY] Louisiana [LA] Massachusetts [MA] Maryland [MD] Maine [ME] Michigan [MI] Minnesota [MN] Missouri [MO] Mississippi [MS] Montana [MT] North Carolina [NC] North Dakota [ND] Nebraska [NE] New Hampshire [NH] New Jersey [NJ] New Mexico [NM] Nevada [NV] New York [NY] Ohio [OH] Oklahoma [OK] Oregon [OR] Pennsylvania [PA] Rhode Island [RI] South Carolina [SC] South Dakota [SD] Tennessee [TN] Texas [TX] Utah [UT] Virginia [VA] Vermont [VT] Washington [WA] Wisconsin [WI] West Virginia [WV] Wyoming [WY]Canada: Alberta [AB] British Columbia [BC] Manitoba [MB] New Brunswick [NB] Newfoundland and Labrador [NL] Northwest Territories [NT] Nova Scotia [NS] Nunavut [NU] Ontario [ON] Prince Edward Island [PE] Quebec [QC] Saskatchewan [SK] Yukon [YT]

October 30, 2008 at 2:17 pm Leave a comment

About Commercial Wood Chippers

About Commercial Wood Chippers                                                                                                          Despite their reputation from the movies, wood chippers are used to dispose of fallen branches, downed tree limbs and expired Christmas trees. City crews use large industrial versions to clean up parks, and landscape crews use smaller versions to clear brush and create mulch. While few city slickers own one, many country dwellers find them invaluable for cleaning up in spring or after a storm.

When you get into commercial or industrial wood chippers, there are other features you need to look at than compared with home wood shredders. See if the model has a feed stop bar or is an automatic feeder. Automatic feeders from Altec Enviromental, Bandit, & Wood Chuck let the chipper adjust the roller speed based on the resistance detected. A major safety feature on SmartFeed chippers from Altec Enviromental, Bandit, & Wood Chuck is that the machine will automatically reverse the rollers when it jams. What about drum vs disc chipping? Drums do much better with stringy fronds from palm trees and they are more productive with larger branches or pieces of wood. Disc-chipping mechanisms will give you an end product that is smaller and finer than what a drum will produce. Talk to Us to help you, find out which is best for the type of trees and brush you will be chipping or shredding. The big names in the commercial wood chipper business are Altec Enviromental, Bandit, & Wood Chuck. We can’t say one is better than the other, but perhaps they have products that suite your needs better. WoodChippersnmore.com carries a complete line of brush chippers like the Bandit 150xp, Woodchuck W/C 17, Bandit200XP, andAltec DC 1820 18“. With 8,300 In Lbs. Torque theAltec DC 1820 18″ is a monster of a wood chipper. It has a feed rate of 80 Feet Per Minute and a chipping capacity of 19. This disc-style chipper does excellent work for landscaping professionals, golf course managers, tree service contractors, and outdoor work crews.

Be sure to search through our online web page of New Wood Chippers, Used Wood Chippers, Forestry Trucks, Knuckle Trucks, Grapple Trucks, and more!

 Wood Chippers & More, Serving the EnvironmentalArborist, and  Tree Care Industry and many other related industries for over ten years!

 OUR GOAL IS YOUR SATISFACTION!
New Chipper & Forestry Equipment Arriving Daily!
*
Financing and Delivery Available! *

 

Wood Chippers & More serves all 50 states & territories: Alaska [AK] Alabama [AL] Arkansas [AR] Arizona [AZ] California [CA] Colorado [CO] Connecticut [CT] Delaware [DE] Florida [FL] Georgia [GA] Hawaii [HI] Iowa [IA] Idaho [ID] Illinois [IL] Indiana [IN] Kansas [KS] Kentucky [KY] Louisiana [LA] Massachusetts [MA] Maryland [MD] Maine [ME] Michigan [MI] Minnesota [MN] Missouri [MO] Mississippi [MS] Montana [MT] North Carolina [NC] North Dakota [ND] Nebraska [NE] New Hampshire [NH] New Jersey [NJ] New Mexico [NM] Nevada [NV] New York [NY] Ohio [OH] Oklahoma [OK] Oregon [OR] Pennsylvania [PA] Rhode Island [RI] South Carolina [SC] South Dakota [SD] Tennessee [TN] Texas [TX] Utah [UT] Virginia [VA] Vermont [VT] Washington [WA] Wisconsin [WI] West Virginia [WV] Wyoming [WY]Canada: Alberta [AB] British Columbia [BC] Manitoba [MB] New Brunswick [NB] Newfoundland and Labrador [NL] Northwest Territories [NT] Nova Scotia [NS] Nunavut [NU] Ontario [ON] Prince Edward Island [PE] Quebec [QC] Saskatchewan [SK] Yukon [YT] Chippers, Wood Chipper, Brush Chipper, Tree Chippers, Stump Grinders, Stump Cutters, Morbark, Rayco, Vermeer, Woodsman, Woodchuck, Wood/Chuck, Bandit, Conehead, Super Junior, Super 50, RG 50, Super RG 50, Brush Bandit, Bandit Chipper, Bandit Industries, Bandit Stump Grinder, Bandit Stump Cutter, Bandit Beast, Vermeer Chipper, Vermeer Stump Grinders, Vermeer Stump Cutter, Woodsman Chippers, Woodchuck Chipper, Carlton, Carlton Chippers, Carlton Stump Grinder, Carlton Stump Cutters, Cone head, Cone-head, Dynamic Mfg, Dynamic Manufacturing, Conehead Chippers, Cone head Chipper, Cone-head Chipper, Knifesource, Simons, Arborwear, Fecon, Palfinger, Prentice, Petersen, Beaver Squeezer, Mobark, Multi-tip, Sandvik, Duradisk, Greenteeth, Skytrim, Jarraff, WHO, Duratech, Haybuster, Tub Grinder, Horizontal Grinder, Smartgrapple, Chipper Safety, Chipper knives, Replacement chipper blades, McCulloch, Dr Chipper, Troybuilt, Hud-son, Hudson Chippers, Bearcat Chippers, Bear Cat Chipper, Hand Fed Chipper, Brush Chipper, Brush Shredder, Feed Hooper, chipper shredders, Hydraulic Feed Chipper, PTO Chipper, PTO Chipper Shredder

October 29, 2008 at 1:05 pm Leave a comment

Wood Chipper Safety Tips

Wood Chipper Safety Tips
Like snow blowers and chainsaws, wood chippers are handy but should be respected. Every year people get arms maimed in these powerful machines. Always exercise caution when using these and be sure to take the following safety precautions:

Never operate one alone. Even if you’re chipping tiny branches, have someone there in case of emergency. This person should wear the same protection as you do and should stand out of the way if they aren’t helping.
Always wear face shield or safety goggles. Wood chippers send wood flying and it’s easy to get a splinter in your eye.
Always wear work gloves. While work gloves wont’ protect you from the wood chipper’s knives, they will protect your hands when handling branches and rough logs. Make sure the gloves are loose fitting. If they get caught in the branches, you will lose only your gloves, and not your hand.
Wear one-piece cover alls. It’s easy to get your clothes caught in a branch and get pulled in. Be your sleeves are tight fitting. One-piece coveralls are your best bet.
Keep long hair tied up or inside your jacket. If you have long hair, a pony tail won’t be enough. If it falls into the hopper, it could pull you in with it.
Always wear ear protection. Wood chippers are very loud and even a brief exposure can cause hearing damage. While ear plugs will do in a pinch, you’re wise to buy proper ear protection that you can take on and off quickly and easily.
Never stick your arm into the chipper. While this sounds like common sense, many people have done this to break up a jam

About Us Wood Chippers & More, based in Sarasota, FL, is a premium supplier of New Commercial Wood Chippers and premium quality reconditioned Commercial Wood Chippers, Forestry trucks, Grapple Trucks, Knuckle Trucks, Roll Off Trucks and more!

We carry several name brands including: Altec Enviromental Products, Altec, Telelect Bandit, Bandit, Eager Beaver, Wood Chuck, Vermeer, Wallenstein, Jinma, Mid South, Bobcat Skidsteer, Asplundh, Jex, Morbark, Dosko Stump Grinder, Rayco, Promark, Snapper, Hi-Ranger, Lift-All, Terex, Versalift, Duralift, MTI, Aerial Lift of Connecticut and Prentice, and National brands.

If you are looking for Used or New Forestry Equipment, stop by or just call us with any questions.

Wood Chippers & More, Serving the Enviromental, and Tree Care Industrie and many other related industries for over ten years!

OUR GOAL IS YOUR SATISFACTION!
New Chipper & Forestry Equipment Arriving Daily!
* Financing and Delivery Available! *

Wood Chippers & More serves all 50 states & territories: Alaska [AK] Alabama [AL] Arkansas [AR] Arizona [AZ] California [CA] Colorado [CO] Connecticut [CT] Delaware [DE] Florida [FL] Georgia [GA] Hawaii [HI] Iowa [IA] Idaho [ID] Illinois [IL] Indiana [IN] Kansas [KS] Kentucky [KY] Louisiana [LA] Massachusetts [MA] Maryland [MD] Maine [ME] Michigan [MI] Minnesota [MN] Missouri [MO] Mississippi [MS] Montana [MT] North Carolina [NC] North Dakota [ND] Nebraska [NE] New Hampshire [NH] New Jersey [NJ] New Mexico [NM] Nevada [NV] New York [NY] Ohio [OH] Oklahoma [OK] Oregon [OR] Pennsylvania [PA] Rhode Island [RI] South Carolina [SC] South Dakota [SD] Tennessee [TN] Texas [TX] Utah [UT] Virginia [VA] Vermont [VT] Washington [WA] Wisconsin [WI] West Virginia [WV] Wyoming [WY]Canada: Alberta [AB] British Columbia [BC] Manitoba [MB] New Brunswick [NB] Newfoundland and Labrador [NL] Northwest Territories [NT] Nova Scotia [NS] Nunavut [NU] Ontario [ON] Prince Edward Island [PE] Quebec [QC] Saskatchewan [SK] Yukon [YT Chippers, Wood Chipper, Brush Chipper, Tree Chippers, Stump Grinders, Stump Cutters, Morbark, Rayco, Vermeer, Woodsman, Woodchuck, Wood/Chuck, Bandit, Conehead, Super Junior, Super 50, RG 50, Super RG 50, Brush Bandit, Bandit Chipper, Bandit Industries, Bandit Stump Grinder, Bandit Stump Cutter, Bandit Beast, Vermeer Chipper, Vermeer Stump Grinders, Vermeer Stump Cutter, Woodsman Chippers, Woodchuck Chipper, Carlton, Carlton Chippers, Carlton Stump Grinder, Carlton Stump Cutters, Cone head, Cone-head, Dynamic Mfg, Dynamic Manufacturing, Conehead Chippers, Cone head Chipper, Cone-head Chipper, Knifesource, Simons, Arborwear, Fecon, Palfinger, Prentice, Petersen, Beaver Squeezer, Mobark, Multi-tip, Sandvik, Duradisk, Greenteeth, Skytrim, Jarraff, WHO, Duratech, Haybuster, Tub Grinder, Horizontal Grinder, Smartgrapple, Chipper Safety, Chipper knives, Replacement chipper blades, McCulloch, Dr Chipper, Troybuilt, Hud-son, Hudson Chippers, Bearcat Chippers, Bear Cat Chipper, Hand Fed Chipper, Brush Chipper, Brush Shredder, Feed Hooper, chipper shredders, Hydraulic Feed Chipper, PTO Chipper, PTO Chipper Shredder

October 28, 2008 at 8:39 pm Leave a comment

How to Buy a Commercial Wood Chipper or other Forestry Equipment

 

When investing in used Forestry Equipment, it makes sense to put your effort into picking out the right one. It’s certainly worth your time to look and test many different makes and models.

If you work in the Tree Care, Arborist, Environmental, Forestry, Landscaping or in many other related industries, time is the last thing on your hands. There are many companies online who claim to have the best  Forestry equipment. Unfortunately, a lot of them cut corners buy purchasing poor quality  equipment to put in their inventory without reconditioning it or inspecting it thoroughly. All you get from them is Forestry Equipment with new decals, and a high price tag.

So what do you do if you need to buy reliable and high quality Commercial Wood Chipper, Forestry Truck, Knuckle Trucks, Grapple Trucks or other  Forestry Equipment? Just go to our web site! We have a large inventory of  new and used, forestry trucks  wood chippers, brush chippers, stump grinders and other forestry equipment! If you can’t find what you’re looking for, call us! We can help you find it.

The majority of our, Forestry Bucket Trucks, Roll Off Trucks, Cherry Pickers, Aerial Buckets, Chippers, Etc. are acquired from major power and light companies. They have been fleet maintained and are in excellent condition. All units are put through a rigorous 301 Point Safety and Operational Inspection, dielectric testing, and DOT inspection. Any items that do not meet our standard of excellence are replaced or repaired. We want our customers to have reduced down time and increased productivity. So, if you’re looking for the best,  Wood Chippers, Forestry Trucks, Knuckle Boom Truck, , Grapple Truck or other Forestry Equipment, we have the best deals!

Come by and visit us, or Call 800-407-4535 for inventory information. Our friendly staff will be glad to assist you with finding the best type of equipment to suit your needs and budget, and we can arrange specialized financing. We offer a variety of delivery options as well, including Nationwide and Overseas Delivery. Right now, we are offering, FREE NATIONWIDE DELIVERY* for many of our units. Our goal is your complete satisfaction.

We carry many name brands including: Altec Enviromental products, Altec, Telelect Bandit, Bandit, Eager Beaver, Wood Chuck, Vermeer, Wallenstein, Jinma, Mid South, Bobcat Skidsteer, Asplundh, Jex, Morbark, Dosko Stump Grinder, Rayco, Promark, Snapper, Hi-Ranger, Lift-All, Terex, Versalift, Duralift, MTI, Aerial Lift of Connecticut and Prentice, and more

Wood Chippers & More  Serving the Tree Care, Arborist, Environmental, Forestry, Landscaping Industries and many other related industries for over ten years!

Free Nation Wide Delivery
Wood Chippers & More serves all 50 states & territories: Alaska [AK] Alabama [AL] Arkansas [AR] Arizona [AZ] California [CA] Colorado [CO] Connecticut [CT] Delaware [DE] Florida [FL] Georgia [GA] Hawaii [HI] Iowa [IA] Idaho [ID] Illinois [IL] Indiana [IN] Kansas [KS] Kentucky [KY] Louisiana [LA] Massachusetts [MA] Maryland [MD] Maine [ME] Michigan [MI] Minnesota [MN] Missouri [MO] Mississippi [MS] Montana [MT] North Carolina [NC] North Dakota [ND] Nebraska [NE] New Hampshire [NH] New Jersey [NJ] New Mexico [NM] Nevada [NV] New York [NY] Ohio [OH] Oklahoma [OK] Oregon [OR] Pennsylvania [PA] Rhode Island [RI] South Carolina [SC] South Dakota [SD] Tennessee [TN] Texas [TX] Utah [UT] Virginia [VA] Vermont [VT] Washington [WA] Wisconsin [WI] West Virginia [WV] Wyoming [WY]Canada: Alberta [AB] British Columbia [BC] Manitoba [MB] New Brunswick [NB] Newfoundland and Labrador [NL] Northwest Territories [NT] Nova Scotia [NS] Nunavut [NU] Ontario [ON] Prince Edward Island [PE] Quebec [QC] Saskatchewan [SK] Yukon [YT] Chippers, Wood Chipper, Brush Chipper, Tree Chippers, Stump Grinders, Stump Cutters, Morbark, Rayco, Vermeer, Woodsman, Woodchuck, Wood/Chuck, Bandit, Conehead, Super Junior, Super 50, RG 50, Super RG 50, Brush Bandit, Bandit Chipper, Bandit Industries, Bandit Stump Grinder, Bandit Stump Cutter, Bandit Beast, Vermeer Chipper, Vermeer Stump Grinders, Vermeer Stump Cutter, Woodsman Chippers, Woodchuck Chipper, Carlton, Carlton Chippers, Carlton Stump Grinder, Carlton Stump Cutters, Cone head, Cone-head, Dynamic Mfg, Dynamic Manufacturing, Conehead Chippers, Cone head Chipper, Cone-head Chipper, Knifesource, Simons, Arborwear, Fecon, Palfinger, Prentice, Petersen, Beaver Squeezer, Mobark, Multi-tip, Sandvik, Duradisk, Greenteeth, Skytrim, Jarraff, WHO, Duratech, Haybuster, Tub Grinder, Horizontal Grinder, Smartgrapple, Chipper Safety, Chipper knives, Replacement chipper blades, McCulloch, Dr Chipper, Troybuilt, Hud-son, Hudson Chippers, Bearcat Chippers, Bear Cat Chipper, Hand Fed Chipper, Brush Chipper, Brush Shredder, Feed Hooper, chipper shredders, Hydraulic Feed Chipper, PTO Chipper, PTO Chipper Shredder


October 28, 2008 at 7:59 pm Leave a comment


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